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Remote Patient Monitoring for Nephrology

Kencor’s Remote Patient Management is targeted to cardiology patients who have been identified as candidates for Chronic Care Management (CCM) services. In addition to access to Sami, Kencor provides each patient with a kit that includes a wireless transmission enabled weight scale, blood pressure cuff, and pulse oximeter.

What is Nephrology? Nephrology is a specialty of medicine and pediatric medicine that concerns with study of the kidneys, specifically normal kidney function and kidney disease, the preservation of kidney health, and the treatment of kidney disease, from diet and medication to renal replacement therapy (dialysis and kidney transplantation). Nephrology also studies systemic conditions that affect the kidneys, such as diabetes and autoimmune disease; and systemic diseases that occur as a result of kidney disease, such as renal osteodystrophy and hypertension.

Why Remote Patient Monitoring for Nephrology? While most of the medical community has adopted Telehealth into the way they practice medicine, Telehealth for Nephrology is a newcomer. Nephrologists mostly see dialysis patients or patients who are battling chronic kidney disease. Telehealth in Nephrology care can make a tremendous difference when it comes to care coordination, remote monitoring, and follow-up care.

The future of Nephrology needs telehealth

How does high blood pressure affect the kidneys?

With Kencor SAMi™ integrated directly into Remote Patient Monitoring services, each healthcare provider, medical professional, or doctor will receive a personalized user login that will allow them to view and analyze patient-generated health data that is transmitted via the devices or manually entered. The healthcare professional can interact with the patient in the following ways:

Kencor’s overall goal is to facilitate engagement between patients and their providers to reduce unnecessary hospital readmissions, reduce the overall cost of care, and improve patient outcomes.

How common are high blood pressure and kidney disease?

  • Almost 1 in 2 U.S. adults—or about 108 million people—have high blood pressure.
  • More than 1 in 7 U.S. adults—or about 37 million people—may have chronic kidney disease (CKD).
  • High blood pressure is the second leading cause of kidney failure in the United States after diabetes
  • Almost 1 in 2 U.S. adults—or about 108 million people—have high blood pressure.

Body weight

If you are overweight or have obesity, aim to reduce your weight by 7 to 10 percent during the first year of treatment for high blood pressure. This amount of weight loss can lower your chance of developing health problems related to high blood pressure.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is the tool most commonly used to estimate and screen for overweight and obesity in adults. BMI is a measure based on your weight in relation to your height. Your BMI can tell if you are at a normal or healthy weight, are overweight, or have obesity.

  • Normal or healthy weight. A person with a BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is in the normal or healthy range.
  • Overweight. A person with a BMI of 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight. Obesity. A person with a BMI of 30 to 39.9 is considered to have obesity.
  • Extreme obesity. A person with a BMI of 40 or greater is considered to have extreme obesity.

Your goal should be a BMI lower than 25 to help keep your blood pressure under control.

Less is More When You Heart Your Kidneys

If you’re carrying some extra pounds, it may be time to slim down to show your kidneys some love. Maintaining a healthy weight is important for your overall health – including your kidneys. Being overweight or obese may increase the risk for kidney disease in several different ways. 

  The first reason is based on an old saying: "One thing leads to another." Being overweight increases the risk for diabetes and high blood pressure. In turn, diabetes and high blood pressure are the two main causes of kidney disease.   

Being overweight can directly affect your kidneys, too. Extra weight forces the kidneys to work harder and filter wastes above the normal level.  Over time, this extra work increases the risk for kidney disease. Just remember, when there’s more of you, your kidneys have to work harder to keep up.  

So how do you lighten up to protect your kidneys and overall health? Here are ways to reduce your risk for kidney disease if you are overweight or obese:

  • Know your Body Mass Index (BMI):  This number gives you a rough idea of your total percent of body fat.  Normal BMI is usually between 18 and 25. A BMI between 25 to 30 is considered overweight, and greater than 30 is considered obese. You may have a higher weight compared to other people, but you may have a normal BMI.  This happens if you have more body weight coming from muscle than coming from fat.  Having more muscle than fat is healthier. Eat a diet rich in fruits and veggies.
  • Make lifestyle changes, such as getting more exercise and watching portion sizes.
  • Get your kidneys checked. It just takes two simple tests – blood and urine – at your primary care doctor’s office to check for any signs of kidney disease.
  • Control blood sugar if you have diabetes.
  • Control blood pressure if you have high blood pressure.

Oxygen and the Kidneys: How does oxygen affect the kidneys?

It’s common for people who have chronic lung diseases, such as COPD, to also have other health conditions. Chronic renal failure is one condition that can occur in association with chronic lung diseases.

When the kidneys receive insufficient oxygen, hypoxia (low blood oxygen) can occur, and chronic renal failure can follow. As this kidney disease progresses, the kidneys become increasingly full of fibrous tissue, and they cannot filter the blood or regulate salt properly. Like all organs, the kidneys need oxygen to perform well.

When the body has trouble getting enough oxygen and taking oxygenated blood to organs, tissues and cells, other health conditions can occur. Oxygen and the kidneys work together to help the body maintain proper functions.

Nephrology is a specialty of medicine and pediatric medicine that concerns with study of the kidneys, specifically normal kidney function and kidney disease, the preservation of kidney health, and the treatment of kidney disease, from diet and medication to renal replacement therapy.

Signs and symptoms of nephrotic syndrome include:

  • Severe swelling (edema), particularly around your eyes and in your ankles and feet
  • Foamy urine, a result of excess protein in your urine
  • Weight gain due to fluid retention
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite